Set 58- Five New Words For Dec 28

Theme- Words borrowed from German

1. wunderkind (VOON-duhr-kind, wun-)

MEANING:
noun:
1. A child prodigy.
2. A person who achieves great success early in the career.

USAGE:
“Miguel Angel Sano is the wunderkind, one of the best young players the Dominican Republic has ever produced.”

2. gemutlichkeit (guh-myoot-lish-KYT, -likh-, -MOOT-)

MEANING:
noun: Warm friendliness; comfortableness; coziness.

USAGE:
“The establishment’s gemutlichkeit is fueled by a low-key, funky decor and the friendliness of the staff.”

3. blitzkrieg (BLITS-kreeg)

MEANING:
noun: 1. An intense campaign, for example, an ad blitz. 2. A swift, sudden military attack, especially aerial bombardment.
verb tr.: To attack or destroy in a sudden campaign.

USAGE:
“It was a blitzkrieg of love, an admiration avalanche.”

“It’s an engineering blitzkrieg meant to awe the Chinese people and show off the nation’s new industrial might.”

4. kulturkampf (kool-TOOR-kahmpf)

MEANING:
noun: A cultural conflict, especially one religious in nature.

NOTES:
The original Kulturkampf took place in the 1880s between the German government and the Roman Catholic Church over control of education, laws related to marriage, etc.

USAGE:
“Rabbi Michael Melchior: ‘The settlers have succeeded in making [the withdrawal] a story of Judaism versus emptiness. They have turned it into a Kulturkampf.'”

5. kaffeeklatsch (KAH-fee-klach)

MEANING:
noun: An informal social gathering for coffee and conversation.

USAGE:
“I can always count on my monthly kaffeeklatsches with my fellow scribes to surface the news items that really matter.”

Set 53 – Five New Words For Nov23

Theme – Together these words use all letters of the alphabet except the letter L.

1. wakerife(WAYK-ryf)

MEANING:
adjective: Wakeful; alert.

USAGE:
“If you’re still wakerife let me suggest another, possibly chastening, exercise in memory.”

“As for me, I’m wakerife and morne, but hope springs eternal. I don’t know how she does it, what with those leg irons on, but spring she does.”

2. quadrennium (kwa-DREN-ee-uhm)

MEANING:
noun: A period of four years.

USAGE:
“Maybe it’s because I’m an Olympic dad, but my wife and I had a baby each quadrennium.”

3. subjugate

MEANING:
verb tr.: To bring under control or to make submissive.

USAGE:
“Even more families lost control of their land, as the Indonesian army divided and relocated communities in its attempt to subjugate the population.”

4. xerophyte (ZEER-uh-fyt)

MEANING:
noun: A plant adapted to growing in a very dry or desert environment.

USAGE:
“Saavik’s bemused comment when Captain Howe, her former first officer, had sent her a ‘get well cactus’ was that on Vulcan it was a superfluous xerophyte.”

5. conversazione (kon-vuhr-saht-see-O-nee, kahn-, -nay)

MEANING:
noun: A formal gathering for conversation, especially on arts, literature, etc.

USAGE:
“We must invite them to our conversazione.”

Set 23 – Five NEw Words for Nov 23

Theme: What a difference a letter makes

1. palatine (PAL-uh-tyn, -teen)
MEANING:
adjective:
1. Of or relating to a palace.
2. Of or relating to a palate.
USAGE:
“The palatine city Qal’a Bani Hammad in Algeria had terraced gardens and, in one of its palaces, an enormous rectangular pool.”
D. Fairchild Ruggles; Islamic Gardens and Landscapes; University of Pennsylvania Press; 2008.

“The teeth, tongue, palate, and gum are subjected to a direct painful influence — that is, direct pain which acts upon the minor palatine nerve.”
Aleksandr Nevzorov; The Horse Crucified and Risen; Nevzorov Haute Ecole; 2011.

2. collier (KOL-yuhr)
MEANING:
noun:
1. A coal miner.
2. A coal liner.
USAGE:
“Gunar turned to find a grimy-faced man, black as a collier.”
Lisa Hendrix; Immortal Champion; Berkley; 2011.

“When the collier Marlin sailed into Hampton Roads on Jan 14, it didn’t arrive like most coal ships do — empty.”
Gregory Richards; Area Getting Two Facilities for Incoming Coal; The Virginian-Pilot (Norfolk); Feb 1, 2007.

2. lares and penates (LAR-eez and puh-NAY-teez)

MEANING:
noun:
1. Household gods (the benevolent gods in an ancient Roman household).
2. Household goods (a family’s treasured possessions).

USAGE:
“But let’s face it, the nearest thing that many Aussies have in the way of religion, or, as it is labelled with new-age vagueness, spirituality, are those little do-it-yourself offerings to the roadside gods, the lares and penates of the new-age pantheists.”
The Soft Toy Taking on a Religious Symbolism; The Canberra Times (Australia); Jan 14, 2006.

“The storehouse of all the shame and vulnerability in Ben’s life would be locked; a private museum of curios with but one visitor, himself, to stare at the degraded and rejected lares and penates.”
Kate Fillion; The Artful Forgery of the Self; The Toronto Star (Canada); Feb 6, 1993.

4. hyperbolic (hy-puhr-BOL-ik)
MEANING:
adjective:
1. Of or pertaining to hyperbole.
2. Of or pertaining to hyperbola.

NOTES:
When you employ hyperbole in your discourse, you are doing what a devil does (to throw), etymologically speaking. The word devil ultimately comes from Greek diaballein (to throw across, slander). Some other words that share the same root are ballistic, emblem, embolism, metabolism, parable, problem, parabola, and symbol.
USAGE:
“‘My objective is to build something sustainable that lasts 100 years,’ says Mr Kotak, who is upbeat without being hyperbolic.”
Kotak Moment; The Economist (London, UK); May 26, 2012.

“She’s made a skirt to wear to conferences
with a crocheted hyperbolic hem.
Each of its ruffles ruffles.”
Susan Blackwell Ramsey; A Mind Like This; University of Nebraska Press; 2012.

5. debark (dee-BARK)

MEANING:
verb tr.:
1. To remove the bark from a dog.
2. To remove the bark from a log.
verb tr., intr.:
3. To disembark.
USAGE:
“Dr. Marder said they will probably debark Truffle unless she quickly learns to play quietly.”
Sam Dolnick; Heel. Sit. Whisper. Good Dog; The New York Times; Feb 3, 2010.

“Mike Rowe finds himself … heading to a mill to help debark and process wood for a log cabin.”
Emily Yahr; Highlights; The Washington Post; Feb 22, 2011.