Set 25 – Five New Words for Jan 25

1.  bloviate

PRONUNCIATION:
(BLO-vee-ayt)

MEANING:
verb intr.: To speak pompously.

ETYMOLOGY:
Pseudo-Latin alteration of blow (to boast). Earliest documented use: 1845.

USAGE:
“All you cinephiles who like to find grand statements and social criticism in horror movies, prepare to bloviate. It’s midnight at the Tribeca Film Festival.”
Neil Genzlinger; Scare Me, Sure, But Also Make A Statement; The New York Times; Apr 18, 2013.

2.
skulduggery

PRONUNCIATION:
(skuhl-DUHG-uh-ree)

MEANING:
noun: Underhand dealing: trickery, bribery, etc.

ETYMOLOGY:
An American coinage, apparently from the alteration of Scots sculduddery (fornication, obscenity). Earliest documented use: 1867.

USAGE:
“In the 1980s [the Vatican Bank] was accused of involvement in financial skulduggery and responsibility for the still-mysterious death of a prominent Italian banker, Roberto Calvi.”
God’s Bankers; The Economist (London, UK); Jul 7, 2012.

3.  honeyfuggle

PRONUNCIATION:
(HUN-ee-fuh-guhl)

MEANING:
verb tr., intr.: To deceive or swindle, especially by flattery.

ETYMOLOGY:
Perhaps from honey + fugle (to cheat). Earliest documented use: 1829. Also spelled as honeyfugle.

USAGE:
“Don’t try to honeyfuggle me, Wolf McCloud. I’m not pretty, and we both know it.”
Jane Bonander; Wild Heart; Pocket Books; 1995.

4.  lallygag or lollygag

PRONUNCIATION:
(LAL-ee-gag, LOL-ee-gag)

MEANING:
verb intr.:
1. To fool around, waste time, or spend time lazily.
2. To neck.

ETYMOLOGY:
Origin uncertain. Earliest documented use: 1862.

USAGE:
“I lallygagged around and when it was evident that they were not coming home to take me, I had to start off.”
Margaret Mason; A Memory at Large; RoseDog Books; 2011.

5,  bumfuzzle

PRONUNCIATION:
(bum-FUZ-uhl)

MEANING:
verb tr.: To confuse.

ETYMOLOGY:
From bum-, probably from bamboozle (to deceive) + fuzzle (to confuse). Earliest documented use: 1900.

USAGE:
“Latt insists the company is not trying to bumfuzzle anybody into believing Asylum’s releases are big-studio product.”
James Hebert; Knockoff Movies Touted as ‘Tie-ins’; Union-Tribune (San Diego, California); August 17, 2007.

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