Set 44 – Five New Words For Dec 14

Theme – Words borrowed from Yiddish

1. bupkis (BUHP-kis)

MEANING:
noun: Absolutely nothing; worthless.

USAGE:
“Sorry, your stock options are worth bupkis.”

2. schnozzle (SHNOZ-ul)

MEANING:
noun: A nose, especially a large one.

USAGE:
“I sneak one long sideways peek at Philip Roth’s nose: the sort of schnozzle that put the rhino in rhinoplasty.”

3. schmo or schmoe or shmo (shmo)

MEANING:
noun: A stupid, boring, or obnoxious person.

USAGE:
“Just because I work at a bar does not mean I want to date every schmo that walks in here.”

4. pogrom (puh-GROM, POH-gruhm)

MEANING:
noun: An organized massacre, officially tolerated or encouraged, against a particular group.

NOTES:
The word is usually applied to the massacre of Jews in Russia and Eastern Europe in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

USAGE:
“Kyrgyz nationalists unleashed a ferocious pogrom against the Uzbekh minority.”

5. dreck or drek

MEANING:
noun: Rubbish; trash.

USAGE:
“Using boot-sale dreck and found rubbish, Michael Landy has created kinetic, three-dimensional versions of saints portrayed in the National Gallery’s collection.”

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