Set 42 – Five New Words For Dec 12

Theme – Words derived from bodily fluids

1. sang-froid (san*-FRWA) [* the first syllable is nasal]

MEANING:
noun: Calmness, especially under stress.

ETYMOLOGY:
From French sang-froid (cold blood).

USAGE:
“We can take a lot more, we the stoic nation with its legendary sang-froid.”
S. Prasannarajan; Shame el-Sheikh; India Today (New Delhi); Aug 3, 2009.

2. lymphatic

MEANING:
adjective:
1. Sluggish; lacking energy.
2. Of or relating to lymph.

USAGE:
“The day has been a real lazy one and I have felt lymphatic accordingly.”

3. seminal (SEM-uh-nuhl)

MEANING:
adjective:
1. Highly original and proving influential on later work.
2. Of or relating to semen or seed.

USAGE:
“It was in 1962 that Rachel Carson published the seminal book of the environmental movement, Silent Spring.”

4. salivate (SAL-uh-vayt)

MEANING:

verb intr.:

1. To show great relish in anticipation of something desirable.

2. To produce saliva.

USAGE:
“The capitalists gathered in Tianjin salivate at the prospect of pushing beyond China’s richer coastal provinces and into the hinterland, where hundreds of millions of new consumers would love to buy a fridge and fancy food to put in it.”

5. melancholy (MEL-uhn-kol-ee)

MEANING:
noun: A pensive, gloomy, depressed state.
adjective: Having or causing a sad mood.

USAGE:
“Loss, estrangement, and distance–and a mood finely poised between melancholy and melodrama — are the collection’s keynotes.”

“His sigh and then his laugh, his melancholy and his humour, made people like him, and he knew it.”

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