Set 49 – Five New Words For Dec 19

Theme – Words coined from body parts

1. inoculate (i-NOK-yuh-layt)

MEANING:
verb tr.:
1. To treat with a vaccine to induce immunity against a disease.
2. To introduce an idea into someone’s mind.
3. To safeguard or protect.

From oculus / eye

USAGE:
“Michael G. Gartner observed last week: ‘You see these young people come and you see them every day and you try to inoculate them with your values and you take great pride when they move up.'”

“It’s a way to help inoculate her campaign from the program’s troubles.”

2. palpable (PAL-puh-buhl)

MEANING:
adjective:
1. Easily perceived; obvious.
2. Capable of being touched or felt; tangible.
3. Capable of being discerned by touching (as an illness or a disease).

[from palpus (palm, stroke, caress)]

USAGE:
“And with that peace has come a palpable prosperity: last year GDP grew by over 7%.”

3. cullet (KUHL-it)

MEANING:
noun: Scrap glass suitable for remelting.

[From French collet, diminutive of col (neck)]

USAGE:
“The resulting cullet is purchased by Owens Corning and remanufactured into fiberglass used in home insulation.”

4. skint

MEANING:
adjective: Having no money; broke; poor.

ETYMOLOGY:
A variant spelling of the word skinned, as in, so broke that even one’s skin is shaved off

NOTES:
Most of the time we make the past participle of a verb by adding -ed to it (walk/walked), but sometimes we use the phonetic spelling as in today’s word. Some other examples are burnt, learnt, spilt, and spoilt. The -t ending is usually used when the past participle is employed as an adjective. By the way, the word ‘past’ itself is a phonetic spelling of ‘passed’.

USAGE:
“I’ve had a run of bad luck recently and I’m totally skint.”

“Much of the information contained in the early reports was ambitious in tone but skint on detail.”

5. pratfall (PRAT-fawl)

MEANING:
noun: A humiliating failure, blunder, or defeat.

ETYMOLOGY:
A pratfall is literally a fall on the buttocks. The word is figuratively used to describe embarrassing errors or failures.

USAGE:
“Some caution that stockpiling is ending and both markets are in for a pratfall.”

[pernicious – adj – having a harmful effect, especially in a gradual or subtle way.]

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